How Do You Solve A Problem Like Tom Forster?

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Abusive practices are common in most non-sports institutions. I wouldn’t characterize them as essential for them to be successful though. I for one am glad Foster’s worst problem is overselling himself to media. As for the rest of American sports, some big changes are underway and more are needed.
 
I think we all agree that Aly Raisman improved from 2012 to 2016 and in her book she talks about how she went to a nutritionist who told her that a carb-free fad diet she had been following was exactly wrong for the work she was doing. Her lingering injuries started clearing up once she was getting the right nutrition. The fact that the athletes are basically on their own for sport fitness (plus whatever their coach happens to know, however outdated it might be) is a huge problem. The national staff should be monitoring and advising based on an individual’s needs.

Chellsie is showing that high level training doesn’t have to be 8 hours a day and a grind if the basics are solid. Letting the coaches abuse and intimidate children in the hopes that some will rise to the top is a terrible way to operate. We don’t do that with education or jobs, so why sport? Innovation and brilliance thrive in supportive atmospheres, not abusive ones. How many potential Simones have been pushed out of the sport due to cumulative injuries, abuse, or just losing the love of the sport?
 
We can’t use this example yet. Let’s wait until she wins a Worlds medal.
That’s why I tried to keep it general. She is doing high level training. She has good basics learned as a child. She is not training 8 hours a day. If you can teach the kids the basics well, they can take time off for injuries (instead of training on them) or for other interests or vacations or frickin’ puberty and not “lose” everything they learned and be starting from 0. With good basics and excellent fitness/strength/muscle support, training actual gymnastics doesn’t have to be the all-day screamfest that too many gymnasts have to try to live through.
 
Sorry, but this just isn’t the case. The level of training it takes to develop these skills to the point where they can be easily maintained is considerable
 
With good basics and excellent fitness/strength/muscle support, training actual gymnastics doesn’t have to be the all-day screamfest that too many gymnasts have to try to live through.
Even if they need to train longer hours to develop muscle memory, it shouldn’t have to be an all-day screamfest. Those two things don’t have to go together.

I agree that basics should be emphasized but repetition is key to performing skills safely on competition surfaces. The repetition can often be on softer surfaces, and I don’t know if I could prescribe how much is needed. It may vary by gymnast, and by type of skill for the gymnast. I do wish US gymnasts would transfer some of their time into repetition of proper spin technique (low impact!) and leaps because that is where we see the weaknesses the most in the US elite program.

The best example of the results of Chellsie’s training plan will not likely be regaining her old skills, but the new ones she is training. Do those become consistent?
 
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My error.
I thought I saw a video from Europeans of Melnikova, Listunova, and Urazova all doing the same bars routine and the video was recorded side by side by side.
 

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